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I would like to say that something starts at the particular moment, e.g. year or season. How should I pose it? For instance.

I watched movies alone before, but starting from this winter, I plan to attend a cinema club.

He always was a lazy couch potato, but since this month, he decided to go to a local gym for some reason.

She didn't pay much attention to him before, but from the last Friday, she became more and more curios about his personality.

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  • The first one sounds as though you haven't started attending the club yet, but the other two imply that the change has already happened. [Ever] since last Friday, she's become more and more curious... If the gym visits started around the beginning of the month, you could say This month he's started going to a local gym... It's couch potato, by the way. Sep 13 at 16:01
  • Because you've already got the word starting in the first example, preposition from is optional / unnecessary: I watched movies alone before, but starting this winter, I plan to attend a cinema club. It would also be valid to omit starting and retain from, but that would be a far less common stylistic choice. For things that started in the past rather than will start in the future, [ever] since, [as / starting] from are pretty much equivalent and interchangeable. Sep 13 at 16:28
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Your first sentence is nearly correct. All you need to do is drop the from. The word starting already implies from.

I used to watch movies alone but starting this winter I plan to attend a cinema club.

Your second sentence will be understood but probably is not the best way to phrase it. Since best refers to things that happened in the past. We cannot say since tomorrow or since next winter but we can say since yesterday and since last winter.

Using since for present can be understood, native speakers sometimes use it that way, but it is not a correct usage.

Using since correctly for a past start --

He is a lazy couch potato but since last month he has been going to a gym.

Using since for the present (sounds awkward) --

He is a lazy couch potato but since this month he has been going to a gym.

Keep in mind the multiple definitions of since. It can also be used to explain a person's motives. The following usage has nothing to do with a time frame although it looks and sounds very similar to your sentence.

He is a lazy couch potato but since this month is World Exercise Month, he is at the gym doing reps.

Using starting for the present --

He is a lazy couch potato but starting this month he has been going to a gym.

Using starting for the past --

He is a lazy couch potato but starting last month he has been going to a gym.

Using starting for the future --

He is a lazy couch potato but starting next month he will be going to a gym.

Since your last sentence occurs in the past you can use either since or starting -- just be sure to the drop the word from and you do not need an article (no the or a).

...since last Friday. ...starting last Friday.

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An expression that could fit all of the examples you shared would be "as of":

I watched movies alone before, but as of this winter, I plan to attend a cinema club.

He always was a lazy coach potato, but as of this month, he decided to go to a local gym for some reason.

She didn't pay much attention to him before, but as of last Friday, she became more and more curios about his personality.

"As of" is used to describe the onset of an action, such as the moment a decision is made, or the starting point for an ongoing commitment. It can be used to describe past, present, or future points in time, such as:

As of last night, I am officially a pilot.

I'm on a low-carb diet as of today.

I'll be three years sober as of next month.

Reference: Cambridge Dictionary

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    From this/that date/time forward, I am/will be exercising on a regular basis. Sep 13 at 16:23
  • @Sean Simon - Why are you suggesting the OP replace starting with as of? Doesn't starting, the word provided by the OP, work just as well?
    – EllieK
    Sep 13 at 16:44

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