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I've been remembering this picture for as long I've been remembering myself.

I've been remembering this picture since I've been remembering myself.

Which sentence is right? I think they have the same meaning but am not sure which is the most natural.

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    Neither is natural - we don't talk about 'remembering ourselves'. We would say "I've known this picture for as long as I can remember.' Commented Sep 18, 2021 at 18:22
  • Is there any chance I could use the "since"? "I've known this picture since I've been able to remember" or "I've been remembering this picture since I've been able to remember" or "I've remembered this picture since I've been able to remember"
    – Let
    Commented Sep 18, 2021 at 18:35
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    Well, a good writer would avoid using the same word twice in a short sentence. You could perhaps say "I've known this picture ever since I could remember anything", but "...for as long as I can remember" is much more idiomatic. Commented Sep 18, 2021 at 18:41
  • If I decided to use "be able to" instead of "could" as in your last example, would it be possible to you a perfect verb form? (e.g. "I've been able to remember this picture ever since I'VE BEEN able to remember anything") I'm asking because I'd like to make a sentence on the model of these: "Since I have been back at work, I have been feeling great.", "It has only been a couple of months since you have been on the job."
    – Let
    Commented Sep 18, 2021 at 18:51
  • It would sound clumsy and unnatural. Commented Sep 19, 2021 at 7:38

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