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Should I use “same” before noun always? Does the meaning change when I use it after noun or why can’t we use it after noun? I mean can I use it after noun ? Like ;

I have the same computer as yours Or

I have the computer same as yours.

But when it comes to the different structure like;

I have a red shirt same as yours.

Would it be correct if I say;

I have a red same shirt as yours.

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  • Informally you might hear someone say "same as yours" meaning "it is the same as yours". So "I have a red shirt, same as yours" would be OK in very informal contexts. "I have the computer" doesn't make sense (there is more than one computer in the world), so you couldn't really use "I have the computer same as yours".
    – Stuart F
    Feb 21 at 12:55

2 Answers 2

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In the first case the correct way would be:

I have the same computer as yours.

The second way isn't proper grammar, to make it proper you would have to make it:

I have the computer that is the same as yours.

Or even better:

My computer is the same as yours.

In the second case the none of them are what I think to be "correct", I would use:

I have a red shirt that is them same as yours.

Or:

My red shirt is the same as yours.

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I have the computer same as yours.

In predicative function, same occurs with the.

Thus: I have the computer (that is) the same as yours.

Would it be correct if I say;

I have a red same shirt as yours.

In attributive function same is restricted to definite NPs so "a red same shirt" doesn't work.

It should be: I have the same red shirt as yours.

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  • This is true in formal contexts, but it's common to omit "the" before "same" in casual conversation.
    – Stuart F
    Feb 21 at 12:57

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