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a. I'd never buy such an expensive car as yours.

b. I'd never buy an expensive car like yours.

Could one use these sentences if they are followed by something like this sentence?

I might buy an expensive car, but it won't be like yours.

I could phrase the question differently for clarity.

Do these make sense?

a1. I'd never buy such an expensive car as yours. If I ever buy an expensive car, it will be like Harry's.

b1. I'd never buy an expensive car like yours. If I ever buy an expensive car, it will be like Harry's.

The problem is that the car's being expensive isn't the issue. It is a particular kind of expensive car.

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    Such an expensive car always implies that the price is the issue. Sep 28, 2021 at 8:21

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I say both of them are a bit not grammatical.

Since such an is virtually meaning (in this case):

to so high a degree; so great (often used to emphasize a quality).

Whereas you're saying:

I'd never buy such an expensive car as yours. If I ever buy an expensive car, it will be like Harry's.

Which doesn't mean you don't want to buy an expensive car, it just means that you don't want a specific kind of expensive car, you'd rather have Harry's car.

So I would use:

If I was to buy an expensive car, I'd never chose to have a car like yours. I would rather have Harry's car.

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