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As you may know 'The Hateful Eight' is title of a film.

does 'The Hateful Eight' means the same 'the eight hatefuls'?

Is it right to say "The Eight Hatefuls"?

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Yes and no, to both questions.

does 'The Hateful Eight' means the same 'the eight hatefuls'?

Well, the structure "The [adjective] [number]" implies one more noun. Often the appropriate noun might just be "people": "The hateful eight people," "The magnificent seven people." In the case of "The Big Three" it's countries.

To say "The eight hatefuls" is to make a noun out of an adjective (and a plural noun, too!). This is not unheard of ("The Rowdies," "the great unwashed"), and works pretty much the same way, by still making implicit reference to some noun.

Is it right to say "The Eight Hatefuls"?

If it's a title, there's a lot of room for poetic license in titles. You can call your movie Se7en, you can name your band "Toad the Wet Sprocket." (Of course, if you want to avoid plagiarising Tarantino, you might want get a bit more original than "The Eight Hatefuls.") But I think the heart of the question is, can I use this in everyday conversation?

I would say not often, because the original construction "The [adjective] [number]" implies that this group is famous, infamous, or at least recognizable. By the end of The Magnificent Seven, no one has to ask "seven what?" The best example from nonfiction I can think of is the "Central Park Five." If you were to refer to yourself and three friends as "The Fearsome Four," you would have to first establish the context and introduce it as a "nickname"; you couldn't simply drop it into conversation (and "the four fearsomes" would be even more odd).

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