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I want to express that there was a lot of work and so I couldn't look into some other things
I found the word "swamp" represents this idea well. I could think of using it in two different ways:

  1. I got swamped with some work <-- I am not sure if this is correct or conveys the meaning. Or probably it conveys I got swamped with some work other than the task at hand so that I couldn't look into it.
  2. I got swamped with work
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    Because some work implies not all, it also usually implies not a large quantity of work. Hence it doesn't work at all well in the context of someone being swamped (which implies there is a large quantity of something that's doing the swamping). Oct 3, 2021 at 17:07
  • If you had a brief period where you had a lot of things all due at the same time, you might say "I was busy with some work". "Swamped" denotes something more serious and overwhelming than just having a lot to do one afternoon: if it's a more serious and longer term problem, then do as FumbleFingers says, "swamped with work".
    – Stuart F
    Mar 17, 2022 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

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Generally the second usage is more appropriate in natural context.

"Overwhelmed with work" might be better if you talking to non native speakers.

The first usage is wordy and might confuse someone.

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I want to express that there was a lot of work and so I couldn't look into some other things

You may use such expressions as

I'm up to my ears in work

I'm buried in work*

I'm overloaded with work

I'm stretched/spread thin (at work).

As for the use of "swamped", you may be swamped with new customers.

Also, you may be snowed under with (numerous) complaints.

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