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Does this sentence sound natural? Should I use "could" or "would" instead of "will"?

Everyone knows about her reputation, and she's unlikely to find anyone who will willingly work with her.

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  • Please tell us what you think is correct and why.
    – gotube
    Oct 4, 2021 at 2:02
  • @gotube: Sorry. I was writing my answer in the other group before it was migrated and I didn't see your comment. Oct 4, 2021 at 3:04

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Welcome to EL&U! Your use of will is correct and natural. We're in the present tense, so you might also use can: "...unlikely to find anyone who can work with her."

No, you shouldn't use would or could here, but you would need them in the past tense:

Everyone knew her reputation and she was unlikely to find anyone who would willingly work with her.

Everyone knew her reputation and she was unlikely to find anyone who could work with her.

[Notice that when we use can or could we don't use "willingly". Willing or not, they are unable to work with her!]

You might perhaps make it more concise and say, "...she's unlikely to find anyone willing to work with her." And 'about' isn't necessary: "Everyone knows her reputation." ("I know your reputation: you are a bully". "I know about your reputation: I know you have a reputation.") Nonetheless, English speakers do sometimes say, "I know about her reputation."

We would probably say, "Everyone knows her reputation and she's unlikely to find anyone willing to work with her."

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  • As gotube hints, we like questions to show the efforts you've already made to find an answer. Do take the Tour when you have time. Oct 4, 2021 at 3:01

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