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Several months ago, a trade association invited me to be its keynote speaker on networking and teaching people to be better conversationalists.

I have read the above sentence in a book. In my comprehension, it is invite sb to do sth, not invite sb to doing sth, so I have two questions:

  1. How to understand the use of "teaching"?
  2. Can I understand the above sentence as the following?(added a comma before "and")

... on networking , and teaching people to be better conversationalists.

Thanks in advance.

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    It's invite someone to speak about doing some things (networking and teaching people to be better conversationalists) which is perfectly grammatical. Oct 13, 2021 at 8:53
  • Do you mean it omitted speak about?
    – fitz
    Oct 13, 2021 at 9:12
  • 1
    Parse the sentence as a trade association invited me to be its keynote speaker on networking and teaching people to be better conversationalists. Oct 13, 2021 at 9:25
  • @MichaelHarvey Can i understand it as "to be its keynote speaker on (networking) and (teaching people to be better conversationalists)", the "networking" correspond to the phrase "teaching people to be better conversationalists"?
    – fitz
    Oct 14, 2021 at 14:26
  • 'Networking' and 'teaching people to be better conversationalists' are two things. Oct 14, 2021 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

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The equivalent of "do" in this sentence is "to be its keynote speaker" , not "teaching". Therefore it is correctly written as "to be" and not "to being".

Networking and teaching is the topic of his speech

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  • edited for correctness Oct 13, 2021 at 10:14
  • Thanks, I think you are right, at first, i thought it was "invite me to teaching people to do ...", but now I have confused which is the subject and predicate for "people to be better conversationalists".
    – fitz
    Oct 14, 2021 at 2:21

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