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This is a paragraph from a programming language book:

It's important to know that C# cannot exist alone; after all, it's a language that runs on variants of .NET. In theory, someone could write a compiler for C# that uses a different platform, with different underlying types. In practice, the platform for C# is .NET, which provides tens of thousands of types to C#, including System.Int32, which is the C# keyword alias int maps to, as well as many more complex types, such as System.Xml.Linq.XDocument

I want to know what is the role of "to" in which is the C# keyword alias int maps to grammatically and also what does the word "to" refer to?

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    It refers to System.Int32 – meaning int maps to System.Int32. If it referred to the earlier .NET then there would be an 'and': "and which is the C# keyword alias int maps to" but that doesn't really make sense. Oct 13, 2021 at 19:19
  • It's bad grammar. It should read, "..., which is what the C# keyword alias "int" maps to", or "..., which the C# keyword alias "int" maps to" (no "which is").
    – gotube
    Oct 14, 2021 at 1:19

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It could be rephrased, slightly more formally, to

In practice, the platform for C# is .NET, which provides tens of thousands of types to C#, including System.Int32, to which the C# keyword alias int maps [...]

That might make it clearer that int maps to System.Int32.

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