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I wonder if we can say, "in a row" without specifying how many times in a row. For example, do you think sentences like the ones below can be said by native speakers?

The Lakers have been winning in a row. Context: The lakers won their last four games

We need to win in a row if we want to be the champions. Context: A sportsperson talking about their team needing to be consistent

The singer said the concert ended, but they surprisingly played songs in a row as an encore. A member of the concert audience telling his friend about a concert at which the band played at least two songs consecutively although the concert ended

I am more used seeing "in a row" with numbers/quantifiers like in, "two times in a row," "many times in a row" etc. So that is mainly why I am asking this question.

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    I would expect to see a number or quantifier (five times, or several times) with in a row. I don't think it's idiomatic without one. Oct 15, 2021 at 7:07

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When using in a row, a quantifier (such as a number, or a statement) needs to be used. Using you examples:

The Lakers have won four times in a row.

We need to win many times in a row if we want to be the champions.

The singer said the concert had ended, but they surprisingly played several songs in a row as an encore.

The important part is the italicized quantifier.

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