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I've faced with the sentence "the term 'hurry' often has a strong suggestion of agitated bustle or confusion", but I didn't understand what the sentence means. Also I like to know what the clause strong suggestion of means? If anyone can give me some examples with "strong suggestion of ..."?

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Words have definitions, and they have implications. There is the literal meaning of the word, and all the associations that come with a word that aren't part of its literal meaning that you would find in a dictionary. These implications are often called "suggestions" or "subtext", and a "hard suggestion" would be an implication or subtext that is very strongly associated with the word.

Note the word "often". When it comes to implications, the situation you use the word in can sometimes drastically change the implication/suggestion. A word in one context can have a completely different feeling to its use in another context. This is why the dictionary definition will almost never include the implication/suggestion/subtext-- because it can change. The only real way to learn these implications is through frequent and constant use of the language. As you see a word used in certain situations, the feeling of that word will grow more and more subtextual meaning that associates the word with that situation.

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  • Should "hard suggestion" be "strong suggestion"? Also, I think that there's something wrong with the final sentence.
    – JavaLatte
    Oct 18, 2021 at 8:09

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