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I'm wondering if it is idiomatic to use a comparative adjective with "in comparison":

In comparison with Joe, Peter is much wealthier.

There is the issue of collocation; "in comparison" and a comparative adjective seem redundant together. "than sb./sth." seems more suited to go with a comparative adjective.

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Yes, it is fine to use a comparative adjective here. You need a comparison, so this is a good way to do so. Another way is, as explained in the comments by rjpond, 'In comparison with Peter, Joe is poor', where no comparative adjective is used.

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    I agree that it's correct to use one, but I don't agree that it's necessary. To me "In comparison with Joe, Peter is very wealthy" and "In comparison with Peter, Joe is poor" are absolutely fine.
    – rjpond
    Oct 21, 2021 at 9:52
  • @rjpond Huh so obvious, yet when I was thinking about it it seemed clear as day that is was necessary - let me edit edit my answer.
    – Jeroen
    Oct 21, 2021 at 9:53
  • @rjpond Don't you think "in comparison" and a comparative adjective seem redundant together? "than sb./sth." seems more suited to go with a comparative adjective. –
    – Apollyon
    Oct 22, 2021 at 1:21
  • @Apollyon I understand your point, but your original sentence (with the comparative) didn't strike me as unidiomatic.
    – rjpond
    Oct 22, 2021 at 7:18

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