0

a. If his store isn't open it is that he has left town.

Can't this sentence mean two things?

  1. If his store isn't open it means that he has left town.

  2. If his store isn't open it is because he has left town.

4
  • 1
    Don't those two sentences, in effect, mean the same thing? Oct 25, 2021 at 11:51
  • 1
    The example text If his store isn't open it is that he has left town isn't valid English. It might occur in a spoken context, but a competent native speaker would usually include a meaningful conjunction such as because rather than just throwing in that and leaving it to the audience to figure out how to connect the two clauses. Oct 25, 2021 at 12:57
  • 1
    ...but to be honest, I don't see any significant semantic difference between your two "interpretations" anyway. Oct 25, 2021 at 12:59
  • 1
    No. The sentence does not mean two different things. What you've written as explanations means the same thing. Oct 25, 2021 at 19:26

1 Answer 1

1

These sentences mean exactly the same thing:

If his store isn't open, it's because he has left town.

If his store isn't open, it means he has left town.

If his store isn't open, you know that he has left town.

the phrase "it is that" in the question is not correct as a replacement for "because" or "it means" or "therefore." You may see "it is that" phrasing in idiomatic expressions such as, "it's just that I (verb)...", which is a long way of saying "but" or "however."

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .