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Is "so" correct with inversion in the following? Is it mandatory?

Just as the French love their wine, so the English love their beer.

Just as the French love their wine, so do the English love their beer.

As the French love their wine, so the English love their beer.

As the French love their wine, so do the English love their beer.

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  • You could omit so and do: Just as the French love their wine, the English love their beer. If you use "so do", you could omit the second verb love. Oct 26, 2021 at 2:18
  • Thank you, but I'm asking whether "so" requires or is compatible with inversion.
    – Apollyon
    Oct 26, 2021 at 2:27
  • All four sentences are reasonable, with the longer forms, "so," and "so do," emphasizing that the relationship between preferences is parallel... and the longer, "so do," form gives a bit more emphasis. Oct 26, 2021 at 22:57

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All four sentences are reasonable, with the longer forms, "so," and "so do," emphasizing that the relationship between preferences is parallel... and the longer, "so do," form gives yet a bit more emphasis then just "so".

Kipling uses that form for his Just So Stories as an amusing device to attest to the verity of fables.

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