0

What is the difference between,

The three pie charts below show the changes in annual spent by a particular school in 1981, 1991 and 2001.

The three pie charts below show the changes in annual spending by a particular school in 1981, 1991 and 2001.

  1. Is spent from the first one past participle?
  2. Is spending from the second one present participle?

Why don't we use spent because "the changes(money) were spent by a particular school"?

2
  • The first sentence is bad grammar. "Annual" is an adjective that should modify a following noun, but "spent" is a past verb form.
    – gotube
    Oct 27, 2021 at 14:37
  • I thought annual is a noun. Your comment is helpful. Thanks.
    – ohmpr
    Oct 28, 2021 at 14:24

1 Answer 1

0

This is historic data about money that has been spent. Money is a noun, so anything that substitutes for this is likely to also be a noun.

In this kind of context, "spending" is a gerund - a verb used as a noun. It means either the money spent in a specific period, or the process/practice of spending money. "Spent" is not suitable for this context, as it is the wrong verb form to be used as a gerund. You could say "money spent" (eg "changes in money spent annually")

You may sometimes see the word 'spend' used in this context (eg "changes in annual spend") which may seem equally ungrammatical, but is accounting terminology.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .