3

As far as I'm concerned, we can use both "however" and "though" rather than the preposition "but" just with a slightly different structures.

Example:

1- He's lived in Germany for 2 years now. However he can't speak German yet.
2- He's lived in Germany for 2 years now. He can't speak German yet, though.

So, I think the only nuance here is the matter of formality where "though" is a quite colloquial / casual preposition here while "however" is somewhat formal.

I need to know whether there is any nuance between the semantic prosody of the two words in the cases above. Do they change the meaning of the same example above or they mean the same and work properly there? If there is any, please let me know about it.

1
  • 1
    You are right that the difference is one of formality. There is no change in meaning. Commented Nov 3, 2021 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

1

Both sentences are alright. For the 1st sentence you should add a comma into the sentence & remove ‘yet’ in the 2nd sentence, making it go something like this:

  • He’s lived in Germany for 2 years now. However, he can’t speak German yet.
  • He’s lived in Germany for 2 years now. He can’t speak German, though.

`

4
  • Thank you @Genie. Just could you please let me know what was wrong with "yet" in both cases?
    – A-friend
    Commented Nov 4, 2021 at 22:28
  • 1
    @A-friend in the 1st sentence ‘yet’ is alright. However, though and yet mean the same so there is no need to write yet. If you wanted to you can just write: He’s lived in Germany for 2 years now. He can’t speak German yet. Or… you can write: He’s lived in Germany for 2 years now He can’t speak German, though.
    – Genie
    Commented Nov 5, 2021 at 8:22
  • I got the point @Genie. Just out of curiosity, could you possibly let me know whether "though" can mean both "yet" and "but" at the same time. As you are well aware, I used it in my original question rather than "but", whereas I found out that it could mean "yet" too. There is something missing here for me and I can't get anything out if it. Please do me a favor and clarify that to me.
    – A-friend
    Commented Nov 5, 2021 at 13:31
  • @A-friend they mean the same so you should avoid using them in the same question/statement
    – Genie
    Commented Nov 5, 2021 at 15:55

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .