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How and when do we use having rather in a sentence?

For example,

The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.

Source: Emma by Jane Austen

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    It should be read as "having too much her own way". The word rather is just an adverb qualifying too much, with about the same meaning as somewhat, or a bit. Nov 7 '21 at 18:33
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The phrase is get/have one's own way.

The author modifies it by adding rather too much.

Rather qualifies too much and means to a certain or significant extent or degree. It might have been used to soften too much (to make it less assertive).

One might parse it as follows:

the power of having rather too much her own way

the power of having [rather too much] her own way

the power of having [[rather] too much] her own way

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