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Can you please explain this structure in the field of comparison and adjectives?

X times as adjective as something

Example:

Astronomers have seen a handful of stars that put out flares of gamma and x-radiation, which can be millions of times as bright as any other repeating outburst known.

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  • Can you provide more details? What is the context? Give us a sentence example if you can ...
    – AIQ
    Nov 8 '21 at 7:54
  • OK) Astronomers have seen a handful of stars that put out flares of gamma and x-radiation, which can be millions of times as bright as any other repeating outburst known. OR) Ted's home costs ten times as much as the one I live in. These examples were in the form of test and the correct answer is related to the topic that I mentioned , can you give more information about it. Nov 8 '21 at 8:37
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    A simple example might be: "Oak is three times as hard as deal". The subject is "oak" and the predicate is "is three times as hard as deal", in which "three times as hard as deal" is subjective predicative complement of the verb "be". “Three times” is a noun phrase with the preposition phrase “as hard as deal” as its complement in which the first “as” modifies “hard”. The comparative clause “deal is hard” is obligatorily reduced to the single word “deal”.
    – BillJ
    Nov 8 '21 at 9:20
  • I paid a certain price for my house. The price Ted paid for his house was that amount multiplied by ten. Nov 8 '21 at 9:23
  • @BillJ is "deal" a typo for "steel"? Ack, deal is a type of wood, pinewood. Never heard of deal as timber.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Nov 8 '21 at 9:59
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I imagine the root of your problem here is the use of "times". In English, "times" can be synonymous with the mathematical operation multiplication.

For example:

  • 2 multiplied by 2 equals 4.
  • 2 times 2 is 4.

Both of these mean the same. The latter is a more simplified way of expressing a mathematical equation. Children (in the UK, at least) are often taught to refer to multiplication tables as 'times tables'.

When comparing two things, you need a measure. In your example, that is brightness. You could say something is "twice as bright" as something else, but when you get into larger, or more complex ratios, you would need to express it mathematically.

Saying that some stars are "millions of times as bright as any other" means that their measured brightness is millions of multiples of the stars they are being compared to.

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