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https://benesse.jp/teikitest/chu/english/english/c00276.html https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/en/%E2%80%9CMust+you+go+now%3F%E2%80%9D+%E2%80%9CYes%2C+I+must.%E2%80%9D/

Here are some example sentences.

A1) Must I visit Yoshi's house?

B1) Must I get up early tomorrow?

C1) Must you go now?

I learnt, however, that "must" indicates, unlike "have to", that it is the speaker who decided to do it. That is,

A2) I must visit Yoshi's house.

means that it's me who decided to visit Yoshi's house, while

A3) I have to visit Yoshi's house.

means that there may be someone else who have me visit Yoshi's house. Is my understanding correct?

Then, I don't quite understand in what kind of situation the first three example sentences can be used.

A1) Must I visit Yoshi's house?

B1) Must I get up early tomorrow?

C1) Must you go now?

If it is the speaker who decided the duty, why would they ask anyone else about their decision?

It's easy to understand "Do I have to ~?" and "Do you have to ~?" but I cannot think of a situation where you'd use the examples above, A1, B1 and C1. Could you give me some examples where these questions are possible?

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  • I must visit Yoshi's house could mean 'Circumstances make it necessary for me to go there' (a social obligation, the need to collect or deliver something...). The meaning is not necessarily different from I have to... Nov 9, 2021 at 9:28

1 Answer 1

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The examples are common and grammatically correct. In context, the usage should be self explanatory:

  • Mother: "You promised to visit Yoshi tomorrow."

    Son: "Must I visit Yoshi's house?" I.E., "Do I really need to do this?"

  • Father: "Since I'll be at work, you'll have to make breakfast tomorrow."

    Daughter: "Must I get up early tomorrow? Couldn't you leave out cereal tonight?"

  • Friend 1: "I have to go to walk my dog."

    Friend 2: "Must you go now? We just started this game!"

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