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I know that "I got married/engaged" means "I was married/engaged" as in action/happening instead of status and " I am married/engaged depicts the status but can "I am married/engaged" also depict the action? Specially if i say "I got married/engaged"?

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    The question seems to contain its answer: ' "I got married/engaged" means "I was married/engaged" as in action/happening instead of status and " I am married/engaged depicts the status.'
    – James K
    Nov 10 '21 at 6:30
  • @James K. Could i replace "got" with "am"? Ex: "I got surprised" transforms into "I am given a surprised" "surprised" as an adjective. If yes then the sentence is not depicting a statuts but a action/happening. Am i right? Nov 10 '21 at 6:42
  • The question isn't about "surprised", it is about "married".
    – James K
    Nov 10 '21 at 6:47
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    @BilalZafar 'I got surprised' can also be changed to 'I am surprised'
    – texasboy
    Nov 10 '21 at 7:40
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    I am given a surprised doesn't make sense; you are given a surprise (noun). Nov 10 '21 at 8:47
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I believe your confusion arises from the fact that there are several different words written "married".

There is an intransitive verb "John married" or "John and Jane married". "Married" is the past tense of "marry".

There is a verb, in which the subject and object are the husband and wife, or the wife and husband. "John married Jane".

There is a verb in which the subject is the celebrant and the object is the husband and/or wife. "Father Paul married John and Jane". "Father Paul married me to my wife"

These verbs have a participle form, which can be used in present perfect and the passive voice: "John has married Jane", "John and Jane were married by Father Paul". "Jane got married."

These verb depict an action.

And then there is an adjective. "John is a married man" "Jane is married".

The adjective describes a state.

Note that the sentence "Jane is married" could also be a passive voice sentence, but it almost certainly isn't. It is nearly always understood to be the adjective.

The distinction is important in understanding "I was married". This usually is the past tense of the adjective and implies "I'm not married now". But it could also be a passive voice: "I was married by Father Paul last week". And that suggests "I am married now"

Grammatically it would be correct to say "I am married by Father Paul every week." This is the passive voice and it means "Father Paul marries me (to someone) every week". But you know that marriage isn't something that people do "every week".

So, without further context, "I am married" is understood to be the adjective, and describes the current state. It would not be understood to be a passive voice sentence, it does not depict an action.

Much the same can be said of "surprised". It is both the past tense and past participle of the verb "to surprise", but it is also an adjective.

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