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To be an example what does "of + gerund" mean in the following sentences?

I'm tired of doing that.

or

I'm sick of being late.

As far as I understand these sentences mean "due to" or "because of". So, is "of + gerund" appropriate for every "because of something" situation? For example I want to mean "I'm asking how to get to there because I don't know the bus way". Can I rephrase this sentence as "I'm asking the bus way of not knowing the bus way."

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    Your sentences are fine except the bus way thing. I don't know the bus route. tired of and sick of + gerund. Not just anything.
    – Lambie
    Nov 10 '21 at 21:35
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    You cannot generally use "of" to mean "because". There are certain phrasal verbs that include "of" ("sick of", "tired of", "in need of"), but those are special cases. Nov 10 '21 at 22:01
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As @CanadianYankee points out

I'm tired of doing that.

the subject is "I", main verb is the phrasal verb "to tire of", and the direct object (not a prepositional object) is "doing that."

I'm sick of being late.

the subject is "I", main verb is the phrasal verb "to be sick of", and the direct object (not a prepositional object) is "being late."

Both "to tire of" and "to be sick of" are transitive verbs. Therefore, "doing that" and "being late" must be direct objects.

"To be sick" and "to sicken" have only a very distant connection in meaning to "to be sick of". Similarly, "to tire" and "to tire of" are only loosely connected in meaning. Hence, both have their own dictionary definitions and grammars.

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