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I am confused about the following description of 'will be -ing' from a grammar book, which says:

We also use 'will be doing' to talk about complete action in the future.

Here is the example in which the grammar book says "will be -ing" is similar to the present continuous for the future:

A: If you see Sally, can you ask her to phone me?

B: Sure. I'll be seeing her this evening, so I'll tell her then.

I suppose the sentence "I'll be seeing her this evening" means the speaker has arranged to see her and is doing that this evening. So, can I rewrite the sentence into "I'm seeing her this evening" without meaning change? I wonder whether "will be seeing" and "am seeing" are interchangble in the case. If not, what difference is there between these two continuous forms when they talk about the future?

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    Yes, both tenses can be used to refer to arrangements for the future. Nov 16 '21 at 8:54
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    Does this answer your question? "Will" vs "going to" vs present continuous Nov 16 '21 at 11:59
  • The suggested dupe doesn't include anything about future continuous, so I don't see how it can be a dupe
    – gotube
    Nov 18 '21 at 8:33
  • @KateBunting, Is there any difference between these two forms when talking about arrangements for the future? I quote the excerpt from my grammar book here, which says "we also use 'will be doing' to talk about complete action in the future. ... 'will be -ing' is similar to the present continuous for the future." I wonder whether they are interchangeable in the example given above.
    – ing
    Nov 18 '21 at 11:45
  • I don't see any difference. The future continuous here implies 'In the normal course of events, I expect to see her.' Nov 18 '21 at 13:31

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