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It is frequently observed that a filler metal will continue to spread beyond an initially wetted surface area over an extended period of time (>10 s), which would not be expected from classical fluid-flow theory. Clearly, classical expressions for fluid flow, exemplified by Eq 1.4, do not strictly apply in such cases. Indeed, this type of flow can usually be associated with solid-liquid interfacial reactions, which are neglected in the model described in Milner’s paper [1958].

Is “such cases” referred to Eq 1.4?
Can this sentence be rewritten as “to exemplified Eq 1.4, classical expressions for fluid flow do not strictly apply to Eq 1.4”?

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2 Answers 2

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It is frequently observed that a filler metal will continue to spread beyond an initially wetted surface area over an extended period of time (>10 s), which would not be expected from classical fluid-flow theory. Clearly, classical expressions for fluid flow, exemplified by Eq 1.4, do not strictly apply in such cases. Indeed, this type of flow can usually be associated with solid-liquid interfacial reactions, which are neglected in the model described in Milner’s paper [1958].

This passage says such cases, of continued filler metal spread, are not expected from/ do not conform to the classical fluid-flow theory. This theory neglected such solid-liquid interfacial reactions in its model.

such cases refers to cases not conforming to the classical fluid-flow theory.

No, your suggested rewritten sentence does not mean the same as

Clearly, classical expressions for fluid flow, exemplified by Eq 1.4, do not strictly apply in such cases.

In fact, classical expressions for fluid flow is exemplified/illustrated by Eq 1.4.

exemplify verb [ T ] UK /ɪɡˈzem.plɪ.faɪ/ US /ɪɡˈzem.plə.faɪ/ C2

to be or give a typical example of something:

This painting perfectly exemplifies the naturalistic style which was so popular at the time.

Cambridge Dictionary

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The opening sentence says that the phenomenon where 'a filler metal ... (>10s)' i contradicts classical fluid flow theory. And Eq.14 is an expression of classical fluid flow theory. So the 'such cases' is those where 'a filler ... (>10s)'.

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  • in such cases means: in cases such as this.
    – Lambie
    Dec 23, 2021 at 16:09

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