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Does any native speakers object to "base themselves" being used on people? A company could base itself in some city. So, is it okay to say the Royal couple based themselves at some place?

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  • From Macmillan Dictionary, base "if you are based somewhere, you have it as your main office or place of work, or the place where you live". -- I think it helps showing that base doesn't always have to be about offices or workplaces. Jul 30, 2014 at 1:45
  • @DamkerngT. So, if, hypothetically speaking, I live in, say, San Diego, but commute to work in Los Angeles, would this sentence: "I am based in San Diego" be ambiguous?
    – meatie
    Jul 30, 2014 at 2:03
  • @snailplane It is very different.
    – meatie
    Jul 30, 2014 at 2:41

1 Answer 1

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This can be used for both people and organizations.

See:

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/34101/based-in-vs-based-out-of

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  • So, if, hypothetically speaking, I live in, say, San Diego, but commute to work in Los Angeles, would this sentence: "I am based in San Diego" be ambiguous?
    – meatie
    Jul 30, 2014 at 2:04
  • Most people would assume that San Diego would be your home base or primary work location. Jul 30, 2014 at 2:40

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