2

1: He doesn't play half as well as his sister does.

2: He doesn't play half as well as his sister.

In sentence one, the second "as" is a conjunction. Am I right? In sentence two, should I take the second "as" as a preposition or as a conjunction with "does" being omitted?

Thank you very much!

  • 2
    More interesting: "as she does" versus "as she/her" – snailcar Jul 30 '14 at 2:18
2

In both sentences, "as" is used as an adverb because it is comparing two things. It is used as a conjunction when something happening continuously over a period of time.

As he got worked harder, his grades improved.

That is an example of "as" as a conjunction. "As" is used as a preposition when referring to a characteristic something has.

They were treated as kings.

1

1: He doesn't play half as well as his sister does.

2: He doesn't play half as well as his sister.

In both the sentences the first as is an adverb, and the second as is a preposition.

A preposition can take a Noun Phrase (NP), or a clause or any other grammatical structure as its complement.

The word - half - before the first as is a determinative, that modifies - as well as his sister does.

A determinative can modify an adverb phrase -

I know I haven't done it that well.

In this sentence well is an adverb and it's being modified by the determinative - that.

0

The second 'as' of both sentences is conjunction since it is followed by a clause. Regarding the second sentence, you cannot compare 'play' with 'his sister'. They are not commensurable. So the 'does' is omitted.

  • Not sure I agree - but I would change #1 to: He doesn't play half as well as does his sister. – SeanGorman Oct 7 '19 at 18:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.