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The: used to indicate a person or thing that has already been mentioned

Only ‘a half apple’ has already been written. In this case, are ‘the’s used well in both sentences?

  1. There’s a half apple. “The” apple weighs 150 grams.
  2. There’s a half apple. “The” half apple weighs 75 grams.

That is, that just ‘a half apple’ has already been written means that both an apple and a half apple have been mentioned?

3
  • Your last paragraph is extremely confusing. Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 11:41
  • @gone fishin' again. Do I better erase the last paragraph?
    – Jennifer
    Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 11:57
  • Unless you can clarify what you mean. Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 12:02

1 Answer 1

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In both examples, it is more idiomatic to say "half an apple" rather than "a half apple".

In your first example, you might possibly mention the whole apple specifically, to avoid confusion.

There is half an apple. The whole apple weighed 150grams.

It 'weighed' because the whole apple no longer exists.

For your second example, you could just use 'it' to refer directly back to the object last mentioned.

There is half an apple. It weighs 75 grams.

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  • I really really appreciate your answer. But I want to know about ‘a half apple’ also because I have occasion to use ‘a half mile.’
    – Jennifer
    Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 11:55
  • Half an apple, half a mile. Perhaps the US would be more likely to use 'a half mile' & I'd be more inclined to use that than 'a half apple' Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 12:02
  • I got what you mean, thank you.
    – Jennifer
    Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 12:04
  • @Jennifer There are grammatical differences in the way that quantities work for discrete objects (apples) and continuously variable quantities (miles), so it’s best not to extrapolate from one to the other.
    – Mike Scott
    Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 12:10
  • @Mike Scott Thank you for advice, Professor Scott.
    – Jennifer
    Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 12:16

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