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334400 new jobs.

Three hundred thirty four thousand four haundered thousands new job.

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    Three lakh thirty four thousand four hundred - InE :) – Maulik V Jul 30 '14 at 11:25
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In some parts of the English-speaking world, people say 'three hundred and thirty-four thousand, four hundred' (perhaps with a short pause after 'thousand'. I always say the 'and'.

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Three hundred thirty four thousand four haundered thousands new job.

Not quite -- the last "thousands" shouldn't be there, and "jobs" should be plural. We would say:

Three hundred thirty four thousand four hundred new jobs.

Sometimes we also say:

Three hundred thirty four thousand and four hundred new jobs.

for a number this long.

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Three hundred thirty four thousand four haundered thousands new job.

You have to use the plural "jobs" in this case. And that second "thousands" is misleading.

You'd say "three-hundred-thirty-four thousand, four hundred jobs".

Think of the "three-hundred-thirty-four" as an adjective applied to "thousand", just as the "four" is an adjective applied to "hundred". That way you won't be tempted to use the plural form of "thousand" or "hundred", which would be non-standard in this construction.

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If it is a telephone number, in British English we would say:

double three, double four, double zero

I realise, in this example it is not a phone number but a quantity. I just wanted to note how digit sequences might be pronounced differently than other numbers.

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