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I wonder what do you call a place / a get-together / a company / an environment, an atmosphere which is safe morally and sexually. In such a place etc. people do not use drugs, do not look for someone just to hook up with, and look at each other in a chaste way. I am wondering if the word "healthy" works in this sense.

Example:

Cindy: Did you go to the party last night?
Barbara: No! They have such get-togethers every other weeks, but I've never go to such places!
Cindy: How come? Is it something wrong with them? Is there someone you don't like?
Barbara: I don't like the relationships between them! The way they treat each other looks disgusting! They don't care about who you are, where you are from! Everyone has got an eye on you and just wants to take advantage of you! I regret going to one of their parties last year and I'm afraid of taking part in such occasions. Everyone was doped up and high! That was very scary.
Their companies / get-togethers / atmosphere / environment is just not healthy at all!

First of all, I am looking for an adjective which can describe such conditions! Secondly, I have my doubts regarding e.g. "healthy" environment! Because, when I search it, I run into many pages that have discussed the phrase as a situation in which people enjoy clean air, stable climate, adequate water, sanitation and hygiene, safe use of chemicals, protection from radiation, healthy and safe workplaces, sound agricultural practices, health-supportive cities and a preserved nature are all prerequisites for good health altogether which has nothing to do with what I need here.

I am wide open to any better, more correct or more common fixed phrase, idiom or expression.

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  • The current term for avoiding such an atmosphere is safeguarding, so she could perhaps say 'they don't feel safe at all." NB A company usually means a business firm, so I'm not sure whether that is what you mean here. Nov 24 '21 at 13:52
  • No no @Kate Bunting! Here, the word "company" means a group of people. The forth definition in the following link: ldoceonline.com/dictionary/company
    – A-friend
    Nov 24 '21 at 14:25
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    Safe seems to work just fine for me, maybe comfortable. I don't see anything wrong with healthy either. That said, neither of those are objective descriptions - to Barbara a party where she's getting chatted up might make for an unhealthy atmosphere, but to Cindy who wants to have a good time, a party where everyone's looking down on drinks, drugs and sex might be unhealthy as well. Nov 24 '21 at 14:33
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    Healthy sounds to me like a rather tub-thumpingly "loaded" term for the intended sense here. For no reason I can put my finger on, near-synonymous wholesome company / venues / pursuits / friends seems a much better choice. Perhaps it's just that wholesome is more often used "semi-metaphorically" to mean "not depraved or corrupting", whereas healthy more often has the literal sense of "promoting good physical health". Nov 24 '21 at 18:07
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    @A-friend: Maciej has exceptionally good command of English for a non-native speaker. But as his previous comment implies, BrE or AmE aren't particularly relevant issues here. Except that culturally, much of American society (at least, as publicly promoted) is far more conservative (Christian) than Britain, so the general perception of what constitutes a "safe" environment for young people in the US might be considerably more restrictive than the same in Britain! For example, I suggest that in the US, what many would call a wholesome environment might actually be homophobic! Nov 24 '21 at 18:16
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wholesome

As FumbleFingers said in a comment above:

Healthy sounds to me like a rather tub-thumpingly "loaded" term for the intended sense here. For no reason I can put my finger on, near-synonymous wholesome company / venues / pursuits / friends seems a much better choice. Perhaps it's just that wholesome is more often used "semi-metaphorically" to mean "not depraved or corrupting", whereas healthy more often has the literal sense of "promoting good physical health".

Merriam-Webster has this definition (my emphasis):

3a : sound in body, mind, or morals

Also, "wholesome" can idiomatically describe a place, company, an environment or an atmosphere in the sense of it being morally sound, or having a mentally healthy, supportive and friendly environment. For events like parties, get-togethers and meet-ups, "wholesome" only applies in the metaphorical sense of being "morally sound", as in, no sex and no intoxicants.

That said, someone like Barbara who believes a party like that is bad for them could naturally describe it as "unhealthy", as that's their opinion, or their assessment of how the party would affect them personally. Many people believe that sexual freedom and judicious use of drugs is a healthier lifestyle than abstinence and sobriety.

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    Brilliant! If I'd thought of looking at some dictionary definitions I'd probably have easily be able to see that they're more likely to mention morally sound in connection with wholesome than healthy. In which case I might have posted an answer myself - but in the circumstances, many thanks for clearing up my doubts as well as responding to the OP. Nov 24 '21 at 18:47
  • Well, then "wholesome" can be used to describe "environment/atmosphere/place/company/get-together/meetup) without sounding awkward or unnatural to you @gotube?
    – A-friend
    Nov 24 '21 at 19:06
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    @A-friend Yes, "wholesome" can describe all of those things, as I've now added to my answer
    – gotube
    Nov 24 '21 at 19:10
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The discussion in comments pointed me to the word decent:

conforming to standards of propriety, good taste, or morality

While still a rather positively-loaded word, it doesn't have the same implications of approval as wholesome or healthy - with those words, there's a heavy implication that the lack of alcohol and flirting is the right way to do things, while decent just describes the party or atmosphere as being in "good taste" without passing as much of a judgement.

(Note that decent also means fairly good, eg. a decent drummer - so make sure there's enough context to distinguish a decent (in good taste) party from a decent (satisfactory) party).

Another word I could use is proper:

correct according to social or moral rules

I'd consider proper a more objective term, although one with rather formal connotations - a proper atmosphere at a party would mean a more formal gathering in which people make specific effort to behave appropriately, while a decent atmosphere would just mean they're not indulging in any immoral acts. (What constitutes an immoral act is left as an exercise to the reader).

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  • Very good suggestions @Maciej Stachowski. Thank you very much for being if help.
    – A-friend
    Nov 24 '21 at 19:57

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