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I am utterly convinced that I was taught two spellings of the word 'separate' The first version, separate describes something in a different location. The second was SEPERATE, a verb describing the action of dividing things that would then be separate. I was prepared to accept this was a false memory until I mentioned this to a librarian of a similar age and background. She told me that she was taught the same thing. I have trawled the internet and dictionaries and found no reference to 'seperate', but..I'm sure I was taught this. Anyone have any ideas??

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Here is your closure. Separate is one of the most commonly misspelled words in the English language. Separate can be an adjective, 'set apart, distinct, or not related', and a verb, 'to set apart, to distinguish, or to divide'.

Separate is often misspelled as 'seperate', a word that has no meaning and is simply a misspelling.

Separate vs seperate

Misspellings can develop a life of their own; the word 'dilemma' is sometimes spelled 'dilemna', and I have heard it arose from a misprint in a dictionary supplied to many US schools around 1958.

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    I've used the mnemonic to help people, "You'd have to be desperate to spell it seperate" - although it's usually just spoken, so I don't have to misspell it in writing. Nov 25 at 11:32

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