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I saw this sentence in a book:

So I move this into the intermediate data structure, removing it from the parameter list.

I want to know whether it is equivalent to this sentence:

So I move this into the intermediate data structure, remove it from the parameter list.

If they are different by meaning, what do they mean respectively?

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    The use of the participle removing shows that the action of moving 'this' to one place has the effect of removing it from another place. The second version is incorrect. Nov 26 '21 at 17:31
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    The second sentence is ungrammatical. It should read, "So I move this into the intermediate data structure, and remove it from the parameter list."
    – gotube
    Nov 27 '21 at 7:19
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according to folk grammar, the remove in the first sentence is used in big form, which indicates it is a non-finite verb form. It is used to show the background information of the verb or show the simultaneous verb done with the actual verb of the sentence. In the second one, the move and revive all used in finite form, which means that they are all verbs. But folk grammar holds that two verbs must appear with a conjunction between them. So the second sentence should be move… and remove… However, it is acceptable in oral english

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    What on earth do you mean by 'folk grammar'? Nov 26 '21 at 17:27
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