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The title has said everything, I suppose. I read a related discussion in this site yesterday (I don't have the link because I don't remember) that the answerer says it's incorrect to write that way without quotation. He meant to say:

I asked 'Who was the winner?'

is should have been written or one could say

I asked who the winner was.

However this is a reporting clause I'm talking about. I.e. the reporting clause has preceded by the reported clause:

'Who was the winner?' I asked who was the winner.

(The sentence above is taken from Grammar In Use by Hewings M.)

Doesn't the author consider saying:

I don't see what are you looking at.

is correct rather than having to write like this

I don't see what you are looking at.

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This issue arises because we have a nominal clause (sometimes called content clause, noun clause, etc.) that is introduced by an interrogative pronoun and includes a predicate nominative (PN). (Please look up those terms if you're not familiar with them.)

Because the pronoun introduces the clause, it comes first. If it is the clause's subject, then we can simply follow it with the verb, and the PN comes last. This works even if the verb is passive. For example:

Without passive: I know who became Superman.
With passive: I wonder what is called "the Big Apple".

However, if the pronoun is not the clause's subject (because it is the PN), then the subject comes next, and the verb comes last. This also works even if the verb is passive. For example:

Without passive: I know who Clark Kent became.
With passive: I wonder what New York is called.

(By the way, the nominal clauses in these sentences function as direct objects, but all of this is true even if the clause functions as a subject, appositive, etc.)

Now let's look at your sentences:

I asked who was the winner.
I asked who the winner was.

In the first sentence, we have standard word order: "who" is the subject and "the winner" is the PN. In the second sentence, "who" is the PN and "the winner" is the subject. Both are correct, but the meaning is different. However, the difference in meaning is actually very minor; after all, "to be" implies that the subject is the same as the PN.

"I don't see what you are looking at." is an entirely different issue, because there is no PN in that sentence. If you have any questions about that sentence, then I recommend posting a new question.

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