-1

is the following rule true?

This not only can be helpful to apply for a refund but also applying for a free ticket.

1
  • 1
    What rule? Do you mean the "rule" that in a not only... but also construction, the first must use an infinitive but the second must use a gerund?
    – James K
    Dec 14 '21 at 22:20
0

The example sentence is incorrect - the two verbs linked by "not only ... but also ..." should be in the same form.

It is also at least a bit awkward because the "can be helpful" is sitting next to one of the verbs. It would be better reworded so that is before the "not only ...":

This can be helpful not only to apply for a refund, but also to apply for a free ticket.

Or:

This can be helpful not only for applying for a refund, but also for applying for a free ticket.

Note the extra "for" before "applying" in the second clause - since this came after the "not only", it needs to be repeated after the "but also".

2
  • it cannot be to and for at the same sentence like: This can be helpful not only for applying for a refund, but also to apply for a free ticket.
    – DrDentMBR
    Dec 15 '21 at 15:21
  • @DrDentMBR In general, the two phrases should "match" as much as possible - so either both should use to+infinitive, or both use for+gerund. Mixing them would be understood, but it would sound slightly odd, and probably be considered "incorrect" in a formal context.
    – IMSoP
    Dec 15 '21 at 15:42

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .