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There are two questions, quite similar.

I know the word twin which means one of the twins. Now, while introducing a girl to my friend, I want to say, "she's a twin" but in this sentence only, I want to tell that who is the other twin of that twins.

She's a twin to her brother OR She's a twin to her sister

Is it fine? Now the second question...

Do I need to put other/another in this case?

She (A) and her brother (B) are twins. She has one more brother (C) but while introducing, she's with her non-twin brother (C). Should I say...

She's a twin to her another/other brother?

Is that okay? If not, how do we say that?

  • As I understand the examples, "She and her brother are twins." and "I have another brother who is my twin." – user3169 Aug 1 '14 at 17:06
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These are all good options:

  • Anne is Bob's twin.
  • She is Bob's twin sister.
  • Bob is her twin brother.
  • Meet Anne, and her brother Charlie. Their brother Bob is over at the pub. Bob is Anne's twin.
  • Meet Anne, and her brother Charlie. Their brother Bob is over at the pub. Anne and Bob are twins.

An introduction might go like this:

  • Maulik (to Anne and Charlie, and gesturing towards Sarah): Anne and Charlie, I'd like you to meet my cousin Sarah.
  • Anne (to Sarah): Pleased to meet you.
  • Charlie (to Sarah): Pleased to meet you.
  • Maulik (to Sarah, and gesturing towards Anne): Sarah, this is Anne...
  • Sarah (to Anne): My pleasure.
  • Maulik (gesturing towards Charlie): and her brother Charlie...
  • Sarah (to Charlie): Pleased to meet you.
  • Maulik (to Sarah, and gesturing towards the pub): Their brother Bob is over at the pub. Anne and Bob are twins.
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I think the conventional phrasing is, "She and her brother are twins" or "She has a twin brother". You can say "She is a twin" though I think that's fairly rare, you usually identify the pair. If the other member of the pair came up in the course of conversation or if the idea is spread across several sentences, you might mention them in the singular. Like, "This is Sally. Oh, look, there's her brother Bob. She has another brother named Jack. Jack is her twin."

  • +1 for Jack is her twin! That's what I thought as well. – Maulik V Aug 2 '14 at 4:39
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I would actually use a different turn of phrase to convey that information:

She and her brother are twins.

If she has more than one brother, and another brother, who has a different age, is present (or known to the person you are talking to, or you need to make a distinction for any other reason), you can say:

She and her other brother are twins.

But again, that is only necessary if you need to distinguish between several brothers.

I don't often come across the use of singular twin, somehow it is usually used in the plural, since there are normally two people involved. However, if one of the twins should die, it is perfectly fine to say she is the remaining twin.

0

Do I need to put other/another in this case?

No, it reads fine without adding "other". "other" seems useless in this case since it is implied by saying she has a sibling.

If she had say three brothers but only one one of them was her twin you would logically say:

She's a twin to one of her brothers

at which point, when asked in greater depth about which, you would be more specific.

However, "other" can be used if she is with someone.

Say she has three brothers and is with two but she is not with her twin:

She's a twin with her other brother who is in the pub

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