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I was reading a review on Amazon which said the following:

To sum up, this method works fine for me and I can recommend it wholeheartedly. But then again, there are always people who love to sweat...

What does sweat mean here?

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    "Sweat" also means "worry" . – mohamed Aug 1 '14 at 21:41
  • The rest of the sentence is...? It could be "sweat" as in perspiration (due to exercise or a stressful situation), or worry or persevere as in "...there are always people who love to sweat it out". – user3169 Aug 1 '14 at 22:11
  • @user3169 That's the end of the sentence. – snailboat Aug 1 '14 at 22:56
  • @snailplane I couldn't tell because of the ... – user3169 Aug 2 '14 at 0:59
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My best guess is that sweat refers to doing hard work. When you do hard work physically, you sweat, and so when you do hard work mentally, you figuratively sweat. This is sense three in Macmillan:

[intransitive] informal to work hard

Why do I interpret it this way? Well, the review starts with this line:

The Assimil method is a great way to build up your language skills in an easy and relaxed manner.

Those people who "like to sweat" are people who like to do things the hard way. The reviewer is characterizing the Assimil method as easy and relaxed, requiring less work.

  • Sweat definitely means "to work hard" in this context (perhaps implying working harder than you have to because you strangely enjoy it.) One of the prior sentences in the review also gives it the needed context, despite the "..." -- "Here's a tip from my own experience: Don't go too fast, never learn more than three lessons a week. [...]To sum up, this method works fine for me and I can recommend it wholeheartedly. But then again, there are always people who love to sweat..." The author is stating an "easy route" to accomplishing a goal, but acknowledging others may want to work harder. – Anaksunaman Aug 2 '14 at 11:15

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