1

Could you tell me if it's correct and natural to say hire someone into the sales department? For example:

Kate has been hired into the sales department for her ability to connect with people.

If it doesn't sound right, can I say it the following way?

Kate has been hired for a position in the sales department for her ability to connect with people.

1 Answer 1

1

"Hired into" is slightly unusual, although there's nothing ungrammatical about it. English often allows a choice of pronouns.

You normally talk about someone being "hired for" a job in general, or "hired as" a particular job or position. Lexico has "hires someone for a job working a cash register" and "hiring him as his personal instructor".

An alternative might be:

Kate has been hired for the sales department for her ability to connect with people.

"For" is repeated, which is the only problem, and not a big problem.

It's common to talk about someone "being transferred into a department", "getting promoted into a job", and similar things, so "into" isn't weird. You may like "hired into" because it emphasises that someone is joining a team, and teams are important in business.

Or you could certainly write it as:

Kate has been hired for a position in the sales department for her ability to connect with people.

That is a bit longer though.

2
  • Hired in the sales department, works well. Bob was just hired in the sales department. If I worked in the marketing department and we just hired Bob, that is how I would tell my co-workers.
    – EllieK
    Commented Dec 16, 2021 at 18:16
  • When you say, "English often allows a choice of pronouns", do you mean "... a choice of prepositions"? There are no pronouns in the example sentence.
    – gotube
    Commented Dec 17, 2021 at 6:54

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .