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When I think of what I want to express, it naturaly comes as the following sentence:

Self/peer assessment report - This evidence has least value and cannot be let to rely on, because...

Is it correct to write "cannot be let to rely on"?

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No, it is not correct.

You want to say that it cannot be relied on or that one cannot rely on it.

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    Could you expand this answer to say why it's correct? Aug 1 '14 at 20:24
  • Where would the let come from? Who's allowing whom to do what? Aug 1 '14 at 20:50
  • @AndrewLeach: No, sorry, I can't say why cannot be let to rely on is not correct. To me, it's as nutty as cannot be eaten to swim on, but I can't really tell you what seems wrong with that expression either. Possibly someone else (maybe you?) can help in this regard. John Lawler's comment raises a couple questions about the meaning, but parsing, let alone deciphering, it is beyond me, I'm afraid. It just feels quite wrong.
    – Drew
    Aug 1 '14 at 21:48
  • @AndrewLeach: I see now that I misunderstood you. You asked why my answer is correct, not why the OP expression is incorrect. Sorry, I don't know what to say there either. I think it would require demonstrating that (a) the expressions I gave are correct grammatically and (b) they convey what the OP meant. I'm not even sure about the latter - just guessing what was meant.
    – Drew
    Aug 1 '14 at 21:51

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