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I read this conversation in the transcript of an episode of the podcast Planet Money.

Early in the morning at a Christmas tree auction, podcast host ROBERT SMITH interviewed CARY NALLS who works in the farm market business and wanted to buy Christmas trees. Because of the high price of Christmas tree, Nalls was desperate and buying No. 2 grade trees which are misshapen or have a big bald spot on the back. After a while, after interviewing other people, SMITH found NALLS and spoke with him again. NALLS luckily bought a couple piles of trees while the other buyers got distracted by donuts.

NALLS: Fantastic. I swear I just kicked - yeah, it's been good.

SMITH: Wait a minute; you are smiling. I did not expect that earlier this morning. You were grim-faced.

NALLS: That's what makes this business so fascinating is that it turns, just spins right out from you.

SMITH: Well, explain to me what happened. What'd you get? Why are you so happy?

NALLS: They must've all been sleeping or something. I don't know. Somebody came over there with a box of donuts, and half the buyers went over there to get them a free donut. And I just scooped them up.

SMITH: What did you get? How many?

NALLS: Just a couple piles.

I wonder what the clause in bold means in this context.

My sense is that it means 'It turns out that it(=this business) depends on how well you do.

Am I right?

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I don't think so

It is always a bit risky to interpret off-the-cuff remarks, because people often speak casually in such circumstances, or even change their minds partway through a statement, leaving the statement unclear or grammatically incorrect.

That said, I believe that in context

That's what makes this business so fascinating is that it turns, just spins right out from you.

is intended to say that the business can change suddenly and unpredictably. In that meaning "it turns" and "spins right out from you" would be two ways of saying the same thing. I do not see any plausioble way this could be intended to mean

It turns out that it (=this business) depends on how well you do.

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