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Could you tell me if I have to use the present simple or the future simple in the context below?

First I need to check with the driver to see if they are willing to sell the car for that money.

First I need to check with the driver to see if they will be willing to sell the car for that money.

To me both seem correct, but I'm not sure.

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    Did you mean 'driver'? In this case, the present tense refers to the time when you check with them; you don't need to use the future tense on the grounds that the conversation hasn't yet taken place. The first sentence is the correct one. Jan 3, 2022 at 15:55
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    Both versions are fine, but idiomatically I think most native speakers would probably use would be rather than are or will be in such contexts. Jan 3, 2022 at 16:10
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    Actually - I've just checked Google Books, and can confirm that there are more hits for "see if they would be willing" than for the same with either are or will be (but are is only slightly less common than will be). Jan 3, 2022 at 16:16

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Any difference between the two sentences is the same difference as normal between present simple and future simple: with "will", it suggests the driver may make their decision farther in the future than when I check with them, or that the decision might be conditional upon something else, like:

"... if they will be willing to sell the car for that money if I pay cash."

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