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She is mad about the latest iPhone model, everyone is talking about [it] now.

Could you explain, please, there is a need to add "it" in the end of the sentence, or not, if "it" symbolizes the latest iPhone model?

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    If you include the word "it", the clause starting at "everyone" effectively becomes a complete new sentence (so the preceding comma could be replaced by a full stop). Without it, all you've got is a relative clause where the optional relativiser (that or which) hasn't been included (the model that they''re all on about). Also in principle the word "it" could be interpreted as referring to the fact that she's mad about the phone, but in practice that would be a perverse interpretation (if that was what was meant, it would be phrased differently anyway). Jan 3 at 18:24
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    Sergei, can you also remove the second question? If you want to know whether "it" can have another meaning, please ask that in a separate question
    – gotube
    Jan 3 at 18:26
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That sentence is not correct. There are a few ways to correct it, depending on your intent:

1 She is mad about the latest iPhone model (which) everyone is talking about ___ now. (without the comma; without "it")

2 She is mad about the latest iPhone model, which everyone is talking about ___ now. (with "which"; without "it")

3 She is mad about the latest iPhone model; everyone is talking about it now. (with a semicolon instead of a comma; with "it")

In sentences 1 and 2, there is no "it" because the iPhone is already represented by the pronoun "which", which is optionally omitted in sentence 1.

The deep meaning of the relative clauses in sentences 1 and 2 is:

... everyone is talking about [the latest iPhone model] now.

The portion in brackets [ ] is changed to the pronoun "which", then moved to the front of the clause, like:

... [which] everyone is talking about _____ now.

In sentence 3, we include "it" because it's in an independent clause, and the iPhone is the object of the preposition "about".

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If you include it, the second part becomes a complete sentence:

She is mad about the latest iPhone model.
Everyone is talking about it now.

You can't ram two sentences together with a comma between them; this is an error called a comma splice. You need to make them separate sentences or use a semicolon between them.

If you do not include it, then the second part is a phrase (I think it's an appositive phrase, although I'm not sure) and should not have a comma:

She is mad about the latest iPhone model (which, that) everyone is talking about now.

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First of all, this is currently a run-on. Putting that aside, though, "it" is needed because it is completing the prepositional phrase "about it." You could easily omit "about it" and say,

"everyone is talking now"

You are correct about "it" being ambiguous in this context, and that should be fixed.

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