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About the people in this book, we will often be suddenly not so sure. A book about, among other things, families and “the rough sexual world that lies outside of families,” “The Children’s Bach” is an exceptionally nonjudgmental work of art, free of the moralizing that often accompanies the fiction of roundness.

What is the meaning of "fiction of roundness"?

I searched on the net but I found nothing? Does it mean: novels that are not deep and are cheap?

source: https://www.newyorker.com/books/second-read/unheard-melodies-on-helen-garners-the-childrens-bach

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    This is not a set phrase with a particular meaning, but at the beginning of the piece the author of the article provides his own definition for "flat" and "round" characters and fiction, which you should use to understand the phrase.
    – Katy
    Jan 5 at 18:57
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    "I often hear writers and readers echo E. M. Forster’s famous distinction between flat and round characters; the former are always the same, say and do the same things, whereas the latter are complicated, undergo change."
    – Juhasz
    Jan 5 at 18:57
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The first words of the article:

I often hear writers and readers echo E. M. Forster’s famous distinction between flat and round characters; the former are always the same, say and do the same things, whereas the latter are complicated, undergo change.

In 'the fiction of roundness' the author is talking about fiction which concerns itself with 'round' characters (those who are complicated and undergo change). She says that The Children's Bach is free from the moralizing that is often seen in that type of fiction.

'The fiction of...' can be read as meaning 'that type of fiction which is about, or is concerned with...'

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