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Probably, if I had lately left a good home and kind parents, this would have been the hour when I should most keenly have regretted the separation; that wind would then have saddened my heart; this obscure chaos would have disturbed my peace: as it was, I derived from both a strange excitement, and reckless and feverish, I wished the wind to howl more wildly, the gloom to deepen to darkness, and the confusion to rise to clamour. (Jane Eyre)

I guess ‘and’ is not necessary or an awkward word, for ‘reckless and feverish’ makes an adjective phrase itself. If this is right, is ‘and’ used just for a literary rhythm, or can an adjective phrase include conjunction?

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    I think the question left by @KenB on this question would apply here as well: in a book like Jane Eyre, it's not reasonable to expect the author would follow all of today's or structural and grammatical practices or vocabulary. – J.R. Feb 24 '13 at 8:50
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    I'm merely pointing out that it's hard to answer your question in a case like this, because it's quite possible that including conjunctives in an adjective phrase was more commonplace at the time, even if it might be more unusual today. I'm not saying the question is unanswerable, but a new visitor here deserves to know that this work was written over 150 years ago in a style not often mimicked today. – J.R. Feb 24 '13 at 9:05
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    Let me try this one more time: Nothing is the matter with wanting to learn the language. There is nothing wrong with this question. I have not downvoted it, I have not voted to close. I have not left a negative comment. I think it's worth pointing out that you are asking about the structure of language that happens to be over 150 years old; however, that doesn't make the question any less valid. Not all comments are meant to criticize; some merely provide additional information for others who visit the site. I assure you, I wasn't being critical, and I was not being "sensitive" about anything. – J.R. Feb 24 '13 at 9:23
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    Also: when I referred to KenB's comment, I was referring the first part of his comment, not his last sentence. I am not saying, "Don't read Jane Eyre" (neither was he). We are merely pointing out that books written in that style are bound to contain confusing phrases and structures, even for native speakers. So, if you ask a question about such matters, many will read the question, and their first reaction will be, "Yup, that's Jane Eyre for ya!" Some of your Jane Eyre questions might be a better fit on ELU, if they stem from more archaic language – but please don't misinterpret that. – J.R. Feb 24 '13 at 9:34
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    If I found the word "puree" in a recipe, and I was confused, it might be better to ask at Cooking.SE than at English.SE. Each exchange has its own audience. Asking about how to pronounce "Charles I" is ideal for here; we encourage English learners to ask questions like that. Asking about conjunctions in an adjective phrase (using a sentence from Jane Eyre as an example) sounds like a better fit for ELU, as that sounds more like a job for a serious linguist. But the choice is yours; I was only trying to give you – and others who might ask similar questions – some (hopefully) helpful thoughts. – J.R. Feb 24 '13 at 10:17
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Reckless and feverish pre-modifies modifies I. If you imagine a comma after and, the meaning should become clear.

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