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a) After having the meal, she went shopping.

b) On being told the party was cancelled, the girl burst into tears.

c) While walking along the street, Sandy answered.

Please, advise whether the ing-forms placed after prepositions act as Participle or Gerund.

I have always thought that it is gerund that comes after prepositions, but working on a grammar exercise that is devoted to participles, I felt doubt.

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    Have you done any research yourself?
    – BillJ
    Jan 6, 2022 at 15:05
  • It seems to be a textbook test on the non-finite clauses. He/she hasn't seemingly.
    – kngram
    Jan 6, 2022 at 15:14
  • BillJ, yes, i have always thought that it is gerund that comes after prepositions, but working on a grammar exercise, that is devoted to participles, i felt doubt. I will surely be seaching more now.
    – IRINA
    Jan 6, 2022 at 15:52
  • Traditional grammar calls them gerunds because the clauses they head function as complement to a preposition, a function typically performed by nouns.
    – BillJ
    Jan 6, 2022 at 15:58
  • ell.stackexchange.com/questions/192354/… is a probable duplicate
    – James K
    Feb 6, 2022 at 13:32

1 Answer 1

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This is actually called a participle clause (you can read more about it by clicking on the hyperlink). Therefore, the verbs having, being and walking in your examples are a participle, the clause containing them (the clause before the mid-sentence comma) is called a participle clause as it is headed by a participle (in this case the participle clause is after prepositions and conjuctions; this is also included in the hyperlink in the last section of the article).

Hope this helped!

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  • The British Council is wrong about this. In traditional grammar, ing clauses functioning as complement of a preposition are gerunds, not present participles.
    – BillJ
    Jan 7, 2022 at 9:40

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