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Is my understanding of these structures correct?

I would have preferred to buy the house= buyinng the house didnt happen.

I would have loved to share my money with her=sharing my money with her didnt happen.

I would have hated him to park his car there= parking his car didnt happen.

I would have hated this to happen= this didnt happen.

I would never have wanted him to pay the bill=paying the bill happend

If they are correct, are there any exceptions with a different meaning?

What about the negative versions of the same structures? Would they mean that those things happend?

Thanks in advance.

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    Why are you asking 7 different questions? Please take the tour and ask just one. Jan 14 at 20:16
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    Sorry .I thought they were related to each other and asked them all together. Jan 14 at 20:19
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    Just one or two examples are cool. You don't need 6 and then ask about their negative versions as well. Jan 14 at 20:27
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These all include a counterfactual. The use of would indicates a conditional, and the perfect "would have" indicicates that the condition is dependent on something in the past. But clearly, events in the past either occurred or didn't occur, so the only use of "would have" is to describe events that didn't occur.

So "I would have preferred to buy the house" implies that "I did not buy the house. This is half of a conditional sentence with the "if" clause omitted, and understood from context: ""I would have preferred to buy the house if the landlord had been willing to sell."

Although it implies that "I did not buy the house" it also tells you more. It says something about the desired and plans of the speaker.

"I wouldn't have preferred to buy the house" doesn't mean that you didn't buy the house. But "I would have preferred not to buy the house" does imply that you bought the house.

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