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It is illegal to buy drugs in the countries, though there are exceptions.

Does that sentence has the only one meaning? Does "exceptions" mean "it is legal action in other (non-mentioned) countries? Or does "exceptions" mean "it can be legal action in some areas in the (mentioned) countries? So, are "exceptions" connected with "It is illegal" or with "the countries"?

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    "though there are exceptions" is redundant, it's already implied by "most"... Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 15:44
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    The whole sentence is unclear because it isn't illegal to buy drugs in any country that I know of. There are, however, many drugs which can only be obtained on the prescription of a medical practitioner, and it is illegal in most countries to buy such drugs without a prescription. And there are some drugs which can't even be prescribed. Perhaps the question would be clearer if it referred to a specific drug. Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 15:49
  • @Andrew Tobilko, You are right. I have done correction.
    – Sergei
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 16:11
  • Are you asking for proofreading of a sentence you have written, or is a sentence you have seen somewhere? It makes even less sense since the edit. When many people talk about 'buying drugs' they usually mean 'illegal drugs' anyway. Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 16:35
  • [ I have made the correction; or; I corrected it.]
    – Lambie
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 16:35

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Edit: This was an answer to the original question, which said "most countries" rather than "the countries".

The natural meaning is that there are some countries where it is not illegal; but there are other possible readings. Another one is that it is legal in some circumstances.

I think if a writer used it in anything other than the first sense they could reasonably be accused of writing unclearly.

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    In what circumstance would you use "in the countries", and not say "in some countries"?
    – Lambie
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 16:34
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    The OP has edited in most countries to in the countries since I answered. In the countries unambiguously implies a specific set of countries, presumably identified previously.
    – Colin Fine
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 16:47
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    That makes it worse for me. I don't see "in the countries"; in these countries, in those countries, in the countries listed below/above, but not just "in the countries".
    – Lambie
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 17:02
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    @Lambie, I don't know why you're commenting about the OP's edit on my answer, which was addressed to the original version of the question.
    – Colin Fine
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 17:06
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    Maybe you need to clarify that in your answer: in most countries, in some countries.
    – Lambie
    Commented Jan 18, 2022 at 17:08

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