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We can use "Where" to lead subordinate clauses when talking about places.

A place where people live

Sometimes "where" can also be used for more abstract concepts.

I missed the part where that's my problem.

My question is, in what cases can "where" be used for abstract concepts or other things that are not places? For example, are the phrases below correct usages of "where"?

A video where people are dancing with music

A situation where people live on food stamps

An opportunity where people can realize their dreams

An adventure where they lost their lives

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There's no clear line that tells you where "where" can be used and where it cannot because to speakers of different varieties of English, some of uses sound natural, and to speakers of other varieties, the same uses sound unnatural, or even wrong.

A reasonable test for where we can use "where" is whether it can be replaced by a prepositional phrase, like "in which", "on which", "into which", "onto which" and so on. This tests the grammaticality and semantics, but not the naturalness.

A place in which people live
I missed the part because of which that's my problem.
A video in which people are dancing with music
A situation in which people live on food stamps
An opportunity through which?? people can realize their dreams
An adventure during which they lost their lives

The "opportunity" one in particular lies on the line between acceptable and not. Some native speakers would say it's fine, while others would say it's not. I put the question marks there because to my Canadian ear, "through" and "opportunity" do not collocate, but to speakers of other varieties of English, they do collocate.

So, to me, the "...opportunity where..." sentence is awkward and maybe even wrong, but to someone else it might be fine.

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