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According to my research, "My sole is tickling" refers to "uncomfortable feeling" or a very little pain like an ant bites you or so, while "My sole is ticklish" refers to a sensation that makes you laugh like someone rubs your sole and tends to be more comfortable than uncomfortable.

And thus, "My sole is tickling" tends to be a bad feeling while "My sole is ticklish" tends to be a good feeling.

That is my research, but I am not so sure because I am not a native speaker.

What is the difference between "My sole is tickling" and "My sole is ticklish"?

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    We don't usually say things like "my sole is tickling", because the verb to tickle usually means "to tickle someone else", like "I am tickling my younger brother." It's not impossible to use it the way you've used it, but it's uncommon.
    – stangdon
    Jan 19, 2022 at 12:45

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I think "My sole is tickling" means it is currently happening since -ing word forms are usually a present participle. However, "My sole is ticklish" means that it is a daily occurrence and it means your foot is usually ticklish all the time.

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    Almost. If we say that a person or a body part is ticklish, it means that they are particularly sensitive to being tickled and will writhe and giggle when it happens (which they may or may not find enjoyable). Jan 19, 2022 at 9:13
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"My sole is tickling" means it is currently happening because -ing word form a present continuous. However, "My sole is ticklish" means that your foot is sensitive and is usually ticklish all the time (whenever something touches it).

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