2

As such, any uncle of hers would be minor royalty, even if illegitimate. (daum.net)

When I saw this structure, I would thought that the preposition ‘of’ presents a set (=a set of her uncles) and ‘any uncle’ is part of the set. But reading this sentence - “Not me, exactly, no. It’s this friend of mine who has a matter to talk over with her” - from a novel, Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands, I would think ‘of’ means ‘that belongs to; that has the property of’. I’m afraid some would say it’s not a big deal. But isn’t it worth to think of, or to be told about from sincere natives?

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  • 1
    See CGEL pages 468-9.
    – user230
    Aug 5 '14 at 9:25
  • @snailplane, Thank you so much. In fact, I've tried yet stopped before finding the contents.
    – Listenever
    Aug 5 '14 at 9:41
1

The preposition of is used to express the possession, definition #9 a.

Usage note: Grammarians have sometimes objected to the so called double genitive construction, as in a friend of my father’s; a book of mine. But the construction has been used in English since the 14th century and serves a useful purpose: it can help sort out ambiguous phrase.

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  • 1
    #8 would be better connected with the OP
    – Listenever
    Aug 5 '14 at 10:30
  • Right, but #9 uses the word possession. Aug 5 '14 at 10:34

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