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We have not begun shipping yet because, unfortunately, there was a delay in getting the right sized mailers. We are shipping out soon now that the problem had been resolved!

We have not begun shipping yet because, unfortunately, there had been a delay in getting the right sized mailers. We are shipping out soon now that the problem was resolved!

Does these sentences mean the same ? Is the only difference on emphasize: one insist on the resolution (first one) and the second on the end of the delay

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  • I think the second one is better because the delay came before the resolution . May be we can write was a delay and was resolved with no emphasize
    – Yves Lefol
    Commented Jan 22, 2022 at 8:27
  • The first one was written by a native speaker so I thought it was right but in fact I did not understand the use of past perfect at the end .
    – Yves Lefol
    Commented Jan 22, 2022 at 8:42
  • Could we write " We are shipping out soon now that the problem is resolved"
    – Yves Lefol
    Commented Jan 22, 2022 at 9:59
  • It was quite possibly a typo "had" for "has", the s and d keys are next to each other on the keyboard.
    – James K
    Commented Jan 22, 2022 at 18:41

1 Answer 1

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There's no need for a past perfect at all. You use the past perfect when speaking about events at a time in the past, but you want to refer to an event that occurred before that time. Here you are not talking about an event that occurred before the past time that you were talking about. It's just something that happened. You could use past tense or present perfect, "was a delay" or "has been a delay"

At the end you are talking about now, so you should use the present perfect. "The problem has been resolved."

Also, there is no particular exclamation so no exclamation mark at the end.

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