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A: Don't you think a bit of distraction might be good for you?

B: I don't know.

A: Well, just let me know if you want to do something sometime.

Will the bold-face statement mean that if B ever at some point in the future wants to do something then he should let A know (does "sometime" help make that clear?)? Or is it a statement that asks for an immediate answer?

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Your first suggestion is correct. "Sometime" is optional but, as you say, helps to make clear that it could be at any point in the future. An immediate answer is not required.

By the way, the exact grammar here is a bit ambiguous:

  1. We can consider this to be a standard if-then sentence. This is clearer if we reverse the order of the clauses:

Well, if you want to do something sometime, [[then]] just let me know.

  1. We can consider the subordinate clause to be a nominal (or "content") clause functioning as the direct object of "know". This is clearer if we replace "if" with "whether":

Well, just let me know whether [[or not]] you want to do something sometime.

The speaker's meaning is very similar in both cases.

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