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Which preposition is more appropriate or more colloquial in this context:

The pupils from Berkeley High school have school from 9.00 am to 3.30 pm.

The pupils of Berkeley High school have school from 9.00 am to 3.30 pm.

I would prefer FROM but I really can't say which one is better.

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  • In conversation, I'd be more likely to say "from" if there were more than one school, and we're comparing school hours. If I were just discussing one school, I'd be more likely to use "of". Perhaps that's just my idiosyncrasy; here's no rule i know of for that, Commented Feb 3, 2022 at 20:24

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"From" suggests origin. It would be a good choice if the Berkeley students are not actually at the Berkeley school for the context of the conversation, but have come to somewhere else. For instance, in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the students of Hogwarts are joined by students from Beauxbatons Academy.

"Of" is a perfectly good choice if we're just discussing schools in the abstract; another would be "at."

The pupils at Berkeley High school have school from 9.00 am to 3.30 pm.

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